SELECTING A SCHOOL

 
Options for a post-secondary school include attending a college or university, community or junior college,  trade-technical school, business school, or a specialized training program.  It is important to know what your options you have.  There may be many schools that will meet specific needs and objectives.  No two schools are alike, and some are very different.  Remember, it can be difficult to find a school that is perfect in every way.  By planning ahead you can possibly avoid the negative consequences of unplanned decisions - transferring schools, poor achievement, dropping out, family friction.

 

Things to consider when evaluating schools:
  • TYPE OF SCHOOL  -  Public/Private, Size, Location, Accreditation
  • MAJORS/COURSES/PROGRAMS              
  • ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS  
  • TUITION/FEES/HOUSING/PERSONAL EXPENSES
  • FINANCIAL AID
  • STUDENT - FACULTY RATIO
  • STUDENT ACTIVITIES
  • SPECIAL SERVICES
  • SAFETY

 

CHOOSING A SCHOOL - MORE THINGS TO CONSIDER
  • Check the admissions requirements of a school to see what the requirements are (i.e.. high school courses, college admissions test (SAT or ACT) scores).  If students do not, it will be important for them to contact the school and speak with an admissions officer to see what will be needed to be a candidate for admissions.  Never second guess an admissions officer - talk to one first!
  • Visit the school.   No matter how attractive the brochure, how exciting the catalog, or how prestigious the reputation, students will never know what a school is like until they have seen it for themselves.
  • Students are responsible for understanding the admissions, financial aid, and scholarship policies of the schools they are applying to including the application and financial aid filing deadlines.
  • Do not rule out a school at the beginning of the search strictly because of the stated cost to attend (known as the "sticker price").  Initially a public school may appear less expensive then a private school, but in the end both schools may be very comparable in cost.  A part of the financial aid formula considers the individual cost of each school  when determining the ability to pay.   By talking with a financial aid officer at each school students can learn if they may be eligible for financial aid  that will make the school an affordable and possible choice. 
  •  If students are having a difficult time choosing which school to attend, they can narrow their choices to the top three and then send  applications. Remember,  each school will have an application fee.  By choosing the top choices, students can save money in the application process.
  • The more information students research on the schools that interest them, the better their chance of making the right decision.  Visit the Guidance Office and talk with your counselor. Use the resources available:  read school catalogs and view books, go on-line and take a virtual tour, read career books and magazines.  Write or email schools for information related to majors of interest. 
  • Sign-up and talk with school representatives when they visit the high school. At the meetings with the school representative - students should introduce themselves,  ask questions,  and take the representative's name or card (it might be needed later in the application process).

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